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This summer 2020 has been something hasn’t it? Outside of trying to survive a pandemic, battling systematic racism, and trying to be a good human we also have to try and maintain some fun and normalcy in our lives. If you’re like me and have been social distancing because of all the chaos of the world, you’ve probably been surfing Pinterest, and making lists trying to find things to entertain you and/or your kids for the summer – am I right? We’ve been taking advantage of the beautiful spring weather in Minnesota and have been spending a lot of our time outdoors gardening, taking walks or playing yard games. Cornhole being our favorite yard game. Today, as part of the Babylock Summer School lineup, I’ll be sharing with you just how easy it is to make cornhole bags. This project is super easy and perfect for beginner and kid sewers – even my 3rd grader can do it on her own. It’s also a great project to occupy your time making them as well as using them for hours of play inside and outside the house.

A fun aspect about this project is that you can decide exactly how fun and funky you want your cornhole bag to look like depending on the type of fabric pattern you choose as well as deciding what goes on the inside. For this tutorial we’ll be using rice, but you can use beans or dry corn kernels too.

Gather Tools and Supplies 

For this project you will need:

Cut the Main & Lining Pieces

Start by cutting the main fabric squares and lining squares out.

A note about the lining: You can use the same type of fabric as you are using for the main, but for this tutorial, I am using lining poly I harvested from the inside of an old purse. It wouldn’t be a project of mine if I didnt upcycle right? lol

The MAIN squares will measure 6 in x 6 in

The LINING squares will measure 5.5 in x 5.5 inches (so half an inch smaller than the main).

BEGINNER TIP: You can adjust these dimensions to the size and shape you desire. The important thing is that the lining pieces should always be at least 1/2″ smaller than the main fabric for the outer shell.

Sew & Fill the Lining

Lay the two pieces of fabric on top of each other, right sides together and clip/pin the layers to keep them in place. Leave about a 2 inch wide opening (or bigger if you need to) between your clips and stitch together from one end of the opening to the other using a 1/2 inch seam allowance. Remember to back stitch at the beginning and end.

Normally, I would suggest that you turn the bag right side out at this point, but because my lining is the same on both sides, I’ve decided to leave it just so. The edges will be hidden inside the bag anyways so it doesn’t even matter.

Next, you’ll fill the lining bag with your contents, for this bag, we’ve used 3/4 of a cup of rice. You can decide if you want it heavier or lighter and add according to your preference, just be sure that each bag has the same amount inside.

BEGINNER TIP: If you find it difficult to add your contents to your bag, just grab a piece of paper and create a funnel! Easy peasy!

Once your bag is filled, sew the opening shut keeping your 1/2 inch seam allowance.

BEGINNER TIP: Push the contents of your bag to the far left and create a barrier using pins so that the contents don’t spill over or under your needle while sewing.

OPTIONAL: Now that your lining bag is finished, you can use your pinking shears to clip the edges of the bag to keep it from fraying.

Prep & Sew the Main Bag

Take one edge of the main fabric square and fold down 1/2 to the wrong side and press. Do this for both main pieces. (You’ll see why a little later. Also never mind my itty bitty travel iron, both my irons have died, and I haven’t gotten a chance to order a new one. Do you have a favorite? If so, please let me know in the comments. TIA!)

Fold out the press you just made and clip/pin pieces together with the right sides facing each other.

Leaving the edge that you just pressed open, pin around the 3 sides of the main square. Start sewing about an inch from the pressed edge and end an inch from the opposite pressed edge. Leaving an opening big enough to insert the bag lining.

Turn the main bag right side out, and use the point turner to shape the edges out.

Insert the cornhole bag lining.

Fold the opening down (see how ironing that 1/2 inch earlier made it easy for you? haha) pin/clip the opening together and then sew the opening shut using a 3/8 seam allowance.

You can stop here, but I prefer to continue all the way around the bag to give it a neater look. AND WALLAH YOU’RE DONE!

BONUS:

Here’s an even easier way to finish your cornhole bag! Simply treat your main fabric like I did the bag lining, with right sides out, and use the pinking shears to give your edges a cool edgy look.

Now that you know how easy these are to make, you can make a whole bunch more and experiment using different sizes and shapes! I hope you found this tutorial helpful, and if you decide to make some, please tag me and let me know, Abigail and I will be thrilled to see.

Also, don’t forget to check out the other makers who are creating and sharing fun projects for this summer. This week, Alex of My Sew Bliss shared a super fun roll up pencil pouch (perfect for backs to school) and next week Amy from Diary of a Quilter will be sharing a patchwork quilt. Until next time, wishing you all a peaceful week and remember to stay kind! xoxo – Candice

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